likeafieldmouse:

Some of America’s most absurd laws illustrated in a photo series by Olivia Locher.

I Fought the Law (2014)

1. In Alabama it is illegal to have an ice cream cone in your back pocket at all times.

2. In Georgia picnics are prohibited in graveyards.

3. In California nobody is allowed to ride a bicycle in a swimming pool.

4. In Ohio it’s illegal to disrobe in front of a man’s portrait.

5. In Kansas it’s illegal to serve wine in teacups.

6. In Utah no one may walk down the street carrying a paper bag containing a violin.

7. In Colorado it’s illegal to have weeds in your yard.

8. In Maine it’s unlawful to tickle women under the chin with a feather duster.

(via maisiewilliams)

humansofnewyork:

"We’re eye doctors."
"What’s something about the eye that most people don’t realize?"
"The eye doesn’t see. The brain sees. The eye just transmits. So what we see isn’t only determined by what comes through the eyes. What we see is affected by our memories, our feelings, and by what we’ve seen before."

greypoppies:

(Photos of women in the circus by Frederick W. Glasier, ca. 1901-1928.)

(via gingerhaze)

(via captainofalltheships)

w4lrusss:

Over three years James Mollison photographed fans outside different concerts for his project The Disciples. As I photographed the project I began to see how the concerts became events for people to come together with surrogate ‘families’, a chance to relive their youth or try and be part of a scene that happened before they were born.”

  • Oasis 
  • Morrissey
  • Björk
  • The Cure

canadianzenscavengerhunt:

Wallflower - Dian Pelangi

(via captainofalltheships)

humansofnewyork:

"Do you remember the happiest moment of your life?"
"Yes. In 1977. My family was sitting by the fireside, during a blizzard, and my mother was reading Great Expectations to me and my father, while we painted a regiment of Blackwatch Highlanders, which were little Scottish soldiers from the Napoleonic wars."

Women in Chicago being arrested for wearing one piece bathing suits, without the required leg coverings. 1922 (x) (x)

(via gingerhaze)

haemus:

Erekle Sologashvili 

humanoidhistory:

Portrait of an Egyptian mummy, 1881, by Emil Brugsch-Bey.

(New York Public Library)

(via biomedicalephemera)

youbestnotmiss:

megustamemes:

[qozop]

weirdly it all seems to suit everyone

(via therightfoot)

vmagazine:

Between 14th & Bedford: NY Subway Dancers (vimeo link)
Directed, shot & edited by Mollie Mills
Featuring “W.A.F.F.L.E” (We Are Family For Life Entertainment) dance crew: Facebook / Twitter / YouTube
Soundtrack: Nas - N.Y. State of Mind

"The longer I spent with them, the more I realised that they weren’t dancing as a hobby or to earn a couple of bucks but a lot of these kids actually needed the money to support either themselves or their families. A lot of them come from poorer backgrounds and areas like Crown Heights and East New York and have bonded over a mutual decision to earn money through something more positive than gang banging, drugs or stealing. What’s more is that dancing on the trains is currently illegal in the New York state. The boys told me about several friends who had been arrested for this harmless and unifying activity.  Aside from some of the more tragic back stories, the dance they’ve created and called ‘Lite Feet’ is phenomenal to watch. - These kids have created an underground community of young dancers all looking for a similar escape from reality.  As they say so appropriately at the end of each dance "Show your love and show your support". - Mollie Mills

images:©mollie mills

(via picardspajamas)

mouzeron:

The ocean at different places at the same beach on the same day.  It’s crazy how different it looks!

(via olyusha)

humansofnewyork:

"My dad lived in Newark, so he’d pick me up on the weekends and I’d go stay with him. But since he didn’t really get along with my mom, he’d never come over to the house. Whenever his train arrived, he’d just call and I’d go to the station to meet him. But one weekend he was three hours late. I tried to call his phone but he didn’t pick up, so I assumed he wasn’t coming and left to see a movie with my friends. I guess his train showed up a few minutes later. Because my mom said he called as soon as I left. When I finally got in touch with him, we got in a big fight. He was mad that I’d gone to see the movie. He said I didn’t care about him or love him. That was on Saturday. Late Sunday night, I got up to go the bathroom, and found my stepdad and mom crying in the kitchen. They couldn’t even tell me he’d been murdered. They just said that ‘something happened to someone in Jersey.’ I asked if it was my aunt. Then my cousins. Then my grandma. And my mom just kept shaking her head. I went down the entire list of people in Jersey before getting to my dad. And with each name I said, I got more and more scared, cause I knew what had happened."